intuitivemusic

Wednesday, July 05, 2006

Well! It doesn't seem there's very much response. If you write, you may send me an email to alert me here...

1 Comments:

Blogger Rupert Guenther said...

Hi Carl, I have experienced that engaging in intuitive music or improvisation can mean many different things to different people.
As you have observed in one of your articles, improvisation and scored music are often seen as polarised, opposites, even as enemies.
My question for us all is: maybe it's time to just recognise it ALL as "music"?
In Beethoven's time, there were certain different styles of music which musicians all knew how to play, within what we would call "classical music".
A musician in the 21st century might play an electronic instrument in one moment and a baroque violin the next. They might play from a score or improvise or both these things. It is just a question of what variety of sound is naturally available to each epoch. If it works well, if it is performed with spirit and sensitivity and meaning, why do we care so much whether it came from a score or was improvised, or was soundscape without conventional notes or melody?
Personally I am very excited by each musician being an original artist in their own right, playing their own concerts of music through improvisation. And every ensemble playing its own music, so they have their own sounds and ways of making music which is special to them.
I feel that this way towards artists making their own original music through inspiration is an important part of the evolution into the future of classical music into its full potential. Otherwise we risk the classical music art-form falling behind the social, conceptual and personal developments which are taking place in the individual and collective psyche. When this happens in any area of culture, that art-form dies and disappears, because people's own personal experiences, how much of their own deepest self they can access, is exceeding that of the art-form.

5:27 PM  

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